Is he the impatient type? Check his eyes - WTRF 7 News Sports Weather - Wheeling Steubenville

Is he the impatient type? Check his eyes

Updated: Jan 23, 2014 10:02 AM
© iStockphoto.com / Stephen Morris © iStockphoto.com / Stephen Morris
  • HealthMore>>

  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...

THURSDAY, Jan. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with fast eye movements tend to be less patient and more likely to make impulsive decisions, a new study contends.

Assessing body movement, including the speed of the eyes as they focus on one thing and then another, helps reveal how a person's brain evaluates the passage of time in relation to the value of a potential reward, the Johns Hopkins University researchers said.

"When I go to the pharmacy and see a long line, how do I decide how long I'm willing to stand there?" principal investigator Reza Shadmehr, a professor of biomedical engineering and neuroscience, said in a university news release. "Are those who walk away and never enter the line also the ones who tend to talk fast and walk fast, perhaps because of the way they value time in relation to rewards?"

Having a better understanding of how people evaluate time when making decisions might help explain why malfunctions in certain areas of the brain make decision-making harder for people with brain injuries or neurological disorders like schizophrenia, the researchers said.

For the study, published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers conducted a series of experiments with volunteers and found a strong correlation between eye-movement speed and patience or impulsivity.

"It seems that people who make quick movements -- at least eye movements -- tend to be less willing to wait," Shadmehr said.

"Our hypothesis is that there may be a fundamental link between the way the nervous system evaluates time and reward in controlling movements and in making decisions," Shadmehr said. "After all, the decision to move is motivated by a desire to improve one's situation, which is a strong motivating factor in more complex decision-making too."

More information

The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry talks about teens and decision-making.

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.