Wheeling, W.Va. (WTRF) – From lesson plans to lunch schedules, teachers have to walk into school every day prepared.

But even the most proactive of educators come across a situation they aren’t ready for.

That was the case last week, when staff at Warwood Elementary noticed one of their kindergarten students was a little quieter than usual at breakfast.

He can tend to be a little jokester every now and then, and I honestly thought that’s what he was doing at the beginning of breakfast, was just being his normal, jovial self.

Christine Doty, Kindergarten teacher, Warwood Elementary

They say the student, who has Type 1 Diabetes, looked extra tired—which is unusual for high-energy 5- and 6-year-olds.

Ms. McKitrick looked at me and said, ‘he looks different,’ and I said, ‘take him to the office.’

Christine Doty, Kindergarten teacher, Warwood Elementary

Aide Stephanie McKitrick doesn’t work with the student’s class.

But she knew about his condition, and just what to do when he began to doze off.

I knew when I was picking him up that things were not the greatest, but when he fell asleep on my shoulder, that’s when the walk turned into a run.

Stephanie McKitrick, Kindergarten Aide at Warwood Elementary

They escorted him from the cafeteria to the school office, where they all worked together to revive him.

And he was almost to the unresponsive point, where he had to be carried in.

Melissa Soltesz, Ohio County Schools Nurse

And to the relief of the many helpful adults in the room, they got him back to normal with the help of a diabetic kit and some juice.

They say he’s been doing great, and have worked out a different plan for breakfast.

Basically I ask him more often, ‘are you ok? Are you ok?’ But I love the little smile I get when he says, ‘I’m good,’ and shoots me a smile back.

Christine Doty, Kindergarten teacher, Warwood Elementary

Ohio County parents and board members celebrated their quick efforts at a meeting this week.

But the staff reacted to their heroism with humility—saying it’s just part of why they come to school every day.

It’s just basically doing my job. That’s what I do, and I just don’t feel that I need any recognition for just doing my job and taking care of the kids.

Melissa Soltesz, Ohio County Schools Nurse

Soltesz says many of their children face chronic and acute conditions.

But parents should feel relieved that the adults in charge know all about them—and are ready to go beyond teaching to do whatever’s necessary for the kids in their care.

It’s nice to know that the staff here can take care of stuff like that, it really is. It makes you feel safe to send your child here.

Stephanie McKitrick, Kindergarten Aide at Warwood Elementary

The teachers also want to recognize Principal Joey Subasic and Secretary Lori Anderson, who helped take the student’s pulse and find snacks for him when seconds counted.