How to stay mentally healthy while self-isolating

Health

Parks are closed… school is out… jobs are shutdown, and you’re out of work… things seem to change each day, and mental health advocates like Amy Gamble knows just how detrimental this can be for your well-being.

Even in a regular time, isolation is a trigger for depression. And if we’re not careful, those who have underlying mental health conditions can have our depression triggered.

AMY GAMBLE – MENTAL HEALTH SPEAKER

Even if you don’t have a diagnosed mental disorder, isolating to protect yourself from covid-19 can cause anxiety or depression.

I know for myself, the first thing that happened for me was sort of surreal shock that the two months of scheduling that I had for talks and training were all of a sudden… gone.

AMY GAMBLE – MENTAL HEALTH SPEAKER

Amy Gamble is a former Olympic athlete. She says the cancellations that coronavirus brings can be frustrating, and although she knows how serious COVID-19 is, it all became a little more real last Tuesday.

When I think about cancellations, I think about the Olympic games being moved a whole year. And having been an Olympian and knowing what that’s like and that anticipation and that training. So, I was trying to think about as an Olympic athlete, what would I do? So, as a bride-to-be, what would I do?

AMY GAMBLE – MENTAL HEALTH SPEAKER

She says the best way to cope with these changes is by finding a silver lining, because changing your perspective, can change your mood.

Maybe the weather will be better that day. Maybe some small thing. Maybe someone who wasn’t able to attend can attend because you changed that date.

AMY GAMBLE – MENTAL HEALTH SPEAKER

Find things to keep you busy like books or puzzles. Focus on today, and maybe even jot down three things your grateful for each night. And if you feel overwhelmed, reach out to a healthcare professional.

Whatever it is that you’re feeling, that you acknowledge those feelings, and just make sure that if you’re really struggling and you can’t pull yourself out of a mild depressive mood or some type of anxiety where your thoughts are just racing over and over again that it’s best to reach out to your healthcare professional.

AMY GAMBLE – MENTAL HEALTH SPEAKER

Amy says after this has subsided, some people may have coronavirus related trauma due to a loved one dying or fear the virus may outbreak again. So, it’s especially important that we are checking in on our loved ones now… versus later. If you need mental health help you can call the mental health hotline at 1-800-223-8255 or text 741-741.

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