Marshall County, W.Va. (WTRF) –An unusual storm producing hurricane-like winds swept across parts of the US on this day a decade ago. The derecho brought along 90 mile per hour winds, heavy rains and widespread destruction.

That storm not only moved through central and southeastern Ohio, but it also hit almost every county in West Virginia.

“It was something.”

Matthew Kramer, the National Weather Service

“It was definitely something we’ll never forget that hit the Ohio Valley.”

Tom Hart, Marshall County EMA

From Indiana to the DC area, a powerful storm knocked down trees, powerlines, ripped apart houses, and shot the power lines. It first developed as a thunderstorm in a relatively small area, but the extreme winds turned it into a derecho.

At its worst, 91 mile-per-hour winds were pushing through, and according to the National Weather Service, that’s intense.

“With 80 to 90 mph wind, you’re looking at the intensity of a hurricane or an EF-1 tornado potentially.”

Matthew Kramer, the National Weather Service

As the derecho moved through the Central and Eastern parts of Ohio and scraped through Central West Virginia, it only grew. It nearly hit the entire Mountain State, including Marshall County.

“Once it hit. It caused a lot of chaos.”

Tom Hart, Marshall County EMA

By time it came across Marshall County, EMA Director Tom Hart recalls winds were around 60 and 80 miles per hour. That damaged several buildings and homes, and even left homes in the county and across the state without power.

“There were significant power outages anywhere from a few days to a couple of weeks. There was just so much damage. We never really experienced any like that before.”

Tom Hart, Marshall County EMA

The National Weather Service says a derecho as powerful as the one that hit back in 2012 could hit here again. That’s why it’s so important to be extra cautious any time a storm does roll in.

“It’s important not to become immune to warnings when you see them. The time you ignore them is the time it’s going to hit you.”

Matthew Kramer, the National Weather Service