Wheeling, W.Va. (WTRF) – Think about just how cold you were shoveling your driveway this week.

Now imagine if instead of heading inside and grabbing a blanket afterwards—you felt that way for your entire day.

More Wheeling residents than you might think are about to face that every day and night—a struggle to even get the rest necessary to find their next meal.

But even the frigid weather is no match for the network of help dedicating their winter to finding roofs for those who don’t have one.

People are finding that if they’re out of a job, or if they’re something like couch surfing, it’s more difficult for them to get back to kind of normal life.

Mark Phillips, Northern Regional Director, Catholic Charities WV

Catholic Charities provides the daytime shelter at St. Alphonsus church.

From 8 a.m. until 4, they offer two hot meals and extra clothes to those who walk in, and even help finding them a place they can go long after the snow has melted.

They say there’s always gratitude among the 40 to 50 who come in at peak times, which has kept them going for their decades of work in east Wheeling.

Every day we have somebody who says thank you for the work that we’re doing. Whether it’s just providing a warm space, or a hot meal, but also for case managers that we have on site, or peer recovery coaches, connections to resources in the area.

Mark Phillips, Northern Regional Director, Catholic Charities WV

A couple blocks away on 16th Street, the Salvation Army is also bringing the heat for winter.

Their shelter is open 365 days a year, but through next Friday they’re offering a home from 4 p.m. all the way until 7:30 the next morning.

Last year a grant was able to cover a day warming shelter, but even without that funding they’re still able to give rest to the weary souls who enter their building.

We’ve discovered that most of the men that come into the shelter are pretty war-torn, if you will. They’re just tired.

Captain Mark Van Meter, Commanding Officer for the Salvation Army

They switched focus to serving men only two years ago, but they still have what they call ‘white flag’ cots available for women and children in their lobby.

Captain Van Meter says while other organizations focus on immediate help for the homeless, they’ve seen results in long-term solutions.

When the men come into the shelter, we basically ask them ‘are you done with being homeless?’

Captain Mark Van Meter, Commanding Officer for the Salvation Army

If they say yes, men can stay longer than the three-week limit, as long as they’re working toward getting an ID, a job and a permanent home.

In the last two years we’ve seen approximately 80 men come off the streets and get into full-time housing because we started doing more management of their case files.

Captain Mark Van Meter, Commanding Officer for the Salvation Army

And then there’s always the YSS Winter Freeze Shelter—now in its 13th year and ready to serve hundreds as the relentless cold settles in.

Each room at the OVMC campus has a bathroom and shower, with a common room especially for community building.

If you’re having, experiencing difficulties with substances, or mental health, or anything, if you don’t have an ID, none of those things are going to keep you from being sheltered at our place, because we want to be able to be open to everybody.

Betsy Bethel-McFarland, Director of Communications and Grants, YSS

Mother Nature doesn’t make winter easy on West Virginia, but thanks to round-the-clock volunteers and the eternal spirit of giving, being left out in the cold will never be a necessity in the Friendly City.

They’re grateful, and they know that we’re here, and that we’ll always be here, and we’ll help them in whatever way we can.

Betsy Bethel-McFarland, Director of Communications and Grants, YSS

Here is when all the shelters are open:

YSS Winter Freeze: Hillcrest Facility at OVMC Campus, 9 p.m. – 7 a.m.

Salvation Army: 140 16th St., 4 p.m. – 7:30 a.m.

Catholic Charities warming shelter: 2111 Market St., 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.