PITTSBURGH, Pa. (WTRF) — The Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh wants to wish you and yours a spooktacular Halloween.

And what better way to do it than by adding to the mix of their very well-known Miniature and Railroad Village, a display that recreates a 1968 thriller movie, The Night of the Living Dead.

In a 7News Exclusive, we walk you through an iconic movie’s Pennsylvania origins and some other scary scenes along the way.

Someone once said October brings crisp, cool nights and Halloween frights.

Science Center employee and model Rosalie Garfinkle takes us on a tour of the village.

The Night of the Living Dead was filmed in rural Evans City, Pennsylvania, and is this year’s newest addition.

It is an actual replica of the ghouls, the church and the cemetery that sits nestled in the village surrounded by other scary scenes.

We are also doing a special Halloween spooky feature throughout the railroad.


Rosalie Garfinkle, Carnegie Science Center, Asst. Mngr. Miniature Railroad & Village

Garfinkle, who is their miniature train and village go-to guru, says it isn’t based on any one area of PA per say.

The Halloween display is quite fitting with all of this fall foliage.

The display is set up so you can take yourself on a self-guided walking tour that highlights parts of Southwestern PA, giving you a general history lesson.

For the month of October in connection with The Night of the Living Dead.

As a treat to trick everybody, the crew at the Science Center, thought, it would be the perfect time to tell folklore, true crime stories and hide little familiar figurines like The Night of the Living Dead display to scare the Halloween socks right off you!

With the chapel from the night of the living dead It became popular because of that movie which was shot in 1968, but the chapel itself was built 1923.


Rosalie Garfinkle, Carnegie Science Center, Asst. Mngr. Miniature Railroad & Village

A gated cemetery full of tiny tombstones near a chapel on some church property.

So for example, next to the chapel we do have Zombies.


Rosalie Garfinkle, Carnegie Science Center, Asst. Mngr. Miniature Railroad & Village

The two ghastly ghouls, in yellow dresses, are the zombies.

Ehhhh!

And if you zoom in you can see them dining on a delicacy fit for a reawakened corpse.

We didn’t have a cemetery on our layout and we needed somewhere to put all the little dead people.


Rosalie Garfinkle, Carnegie Science Center, Asst. Mngr. Miniature Railroad & Village

The scavenger hunt also includes a witch, a seance where people on the porch are hoping to get in touch with some spirits, some trick-or-treaters, a werewolf, a scarecrow, a jack-o-lantern over here, a jack-o-lantern over there next to Mr. Rogers in his neighborhood with Mr. McFeeley and friends.

A total of 13 orange-painted pumpkins were scattered throughout the scenic village.

We also have other features from history, spooky history, from southern Pennsylvania. We have Mothman which is in West Virginia, but is close enough to Pennsylvania that we wanted to put him in here.


Rosalie Garfinkle, Carnegie Science Center, Asst. Mngr. Miniature Railroad & Village

Smile for the camera!

Right along the river’s edge a Bigfoot sighting, how scary!!!

You can certainly see that if you bring your game face for this hunt, there are plenty of pumpkins perfectly placed along the pathway with other scary Halloween staples and a blast from the past showing of a few frightening fellows.

In a second story, we will take us back to the Carnegie Science Center for an exclusive look inside the miniature railroad village workshop to see just how these tiny scenes come together.

You can view part II of this story on WTRF.com on Friday.