WHEELING, W.Va. (WTRF) – Meet DeVante.

He lives in Wheeling but drives an hour to his job near Pittsburgh every day—and gas is hitting him hard.

I’m filling up about two times a week and it’s running me about $100 a week.

DeVante Brown, Commuter, delivery worker

He says his 12-gallon tank used to cost him only about $60 to $80 to fill up every week.

But now that expense has more than doubled, and it’s making him think about working from home, or even relocating.

That’s about $200 out of my paycheck every week, so it takes a toll on the monies.

DeVante Brown, Commuter, delivery worker

DeVante is facing a dilemma that millions across the country are struggling with.

What used to be a manageable cost to commute to the workplace is now becoming a burden that’s difficult to bear.

So what is the key to balancing your budget *and* getting from Point A to Point B?

It lies in what’s called the ‘discretionary dollar.’

It’s what you might call disposable income—the funds that you can afford to let go of if you need to.

Naturally you don’t want to take away from what you’re spending on food, what you’re spending on rent, those are the most important things. So things are going to be kind of locked in stone and you don’t want to touch that.

Jason Haswell, Managing Director, Monteverde Group

And there’s no easy way to say it—that’s going to mean a few more nights eating in.

For example, Starbucks every day. Or going out to eat. Or different things like that, going to the movies.

Jason Haswell, Managing Director, Monteverde Group

Right now we’re just hitting peak season, so don’t expect things to get any easier for the summer.

But he says prices will probably begin to cool down along with the weather around September…just a little bit.When I say a little bit, I mean if it’s at that time it’s $5.50, maybe it gets to $4.50.

For example, Starbucks every day. Or going out to eat. Or different things like that, going to the movies.

Jason Haswell, Managing Director, Monteverde Group

The bottom line is that gas can’t skyrocket forever.

But we’ll have to sacrifice a little bit while we’re along for the ride, to make that eventual drop even better.

Haswell defines the peak season for gasoline as 4th of July until the kids go back to school.

So if you’re planning your summer expenses, unfortunately the craziest prices are yet to come.