WHEELING, W.Va. (WTRF) — There’s a lot of focus on McColloch’s Leap this week, now that the historic monument on National Road is being restored and moved.

Historic McColloch’s Leap monument being moved, restored and relocated


Major Samuel McColloch escaped capture by Native American warriors by jumping off Wheeling Hill on horseback.


7News reporter D.K. Wright asked an area historian what happened to the horse.


And–we won’t keep you in suspense–the horse lived!


Here’s the rest of the story.

Not only did the horse survive, but he kept on going.

Jay Frey, Sons of the American Revolution, Fort Henry Chapter

No, the horse didn’t break any limbs. He was able to ride full speed from the creek bed back to Fort Van Meter.

One of the major’s descendents has researched the leap, and has told Jay Frey that it was more of a slide than a leap.

McColloch didn’t take air and literally jump off this precipice. He coaxed the horse to slide down on its hindquarters with its front legs being sort of a stabilizing force.

He says the horse lived to a ripe old age.

I think the horse lived to be about 30 years old, and that far exceeded the time that McColloch was with us.

Jay Frey, Sons of the American Revolution, Fort Henry Chapter

McColloch’s luck ran out about five years after the leap.

McColloch was ambushed by a Native American scouting party. Um, it’s a rather gruesome story that the Indians ate his heart because they admired his courage. So it was pretty awful.

Jay Frey, Sons of the American Revolution, Fort Henry Chapter

We’ll keep you updated about the return of his monument.